Jobs, Growth and Opportunity

We are building on our strong foundations with a responsible budget focused on small business, better child care and measures that improve fairness

The right time for business to invest

We are creating the right environment at the right time to invest.

The 2015 Budget provides $5.5 billion including $5 billion of tax relief to create jobs and small business growth.

More information on the Jobs and Small Business Package.

Supporting australian families

The Government is supporting Australian families with a $4.4 billion boost making early childhood care more affordable, accessible and flexible, especially for families in need.

More information on Supporting Australian Families.

Fairness in Tax and Benefits

Most Australians do the right thing, that’s why it important we are firm with those who don’t.

The Government will strengthen our tax, foreign investment and benefit systems to make them fair and sustainable for everyone.

More information on Fairness in Tax and Benefits.

Protecting Australia

The Government is investing $1.2 billion in new funding for national security, building on the $1 billion of funding announced last year.

The Government will also be extending and expanding Australia's military operations in Afghanistan, Iraq and the Middle East.

More information on National Security.

Future Challenges

Australia’s population is ageing. There is an urgent need to build productivity and increase participation in the workforce.

Continued progress on budget repair will help us meet whatever challenges the future might bring.

Investing in Australia's Infrastructure

Building infrastructure to support economic growth, create jobs and link businesses to markets in Australia’s regions and cities.

Roads, rail and airports

A $50 billion commitment to improve Australia’s road and rail network will boost Australia’s growth with jobs, improved services, and less congestion on some important urban infrastructure.

Projects include new roads in most Australian states and territories, bridge upgrades, and a new freight rail link in Western Australia.

The $5 billion Northern Australia Infrastructure Facility will help develop Australia’s north through better road, rail, port and power infrastructure. The White Paper will be released later this year.

A 15-year pipeline in infrastructure spending will give certainty to industry and ensure Australia has the infrastructure it needs when it’s needed.

Regional development

As well as investing in Australia’s north, the Government is also developing regional Australia through the $1 billion National Stronger Regions Fund.

Tasmania

The Government has invested $60 million in developing Tasmania’s irrigation system. A further $203 million will be used to expand the Tasmanian Freight Equalisation Scheme to include exports.

The NBN

The NBN is being rolled out across Australia. We expect that 3.1 million homes and businesses will have the NBN in place or under construction by September 2016.

Mobile black spots

The $100 million Mobile Black Spots Programme will see the first base stations rolled out later this year.

HELPING FArMERS IN DROUGHT

Managing and recovering from drought.

Drought assistance

The Government will provide $250 million to continue the Drought Concessional Loan Scheme and the Drought Recovery Concessional Loan Scheme for another year. A further $25 million will help reduce the impact of pest animals in drought-affected areas.

Supporting communities

Farmers will be able to claim an immediate tax deduction for water facilities and fencing from 1 July 2016. They’ll also be able to depreciate the cost of fodder storage assets over three years.

A $35 million grants programme will help rebuild drought affected communities with civil and civic infrastructure projects.

New community and support services will be available for farmers in drought-affected areas with almost $20 million for extending existing social and community support services, as well as $1.8 million to fund 10 new counsellors as part of the Rural Financial Counselling Service.

HEALTH AND AGED CARE

Improving quality and choice in health and aged care.

A healthier system

To improve the sustainability of Medicare, the Government will establish a taskforce to review Medicare Benefits Schedule items to ensure patients receive high quality and cost effective medical services.

$1.6 billion will be spent on new and amended listings on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, including more effective treatments for cancer. The Government will also invest $485 million to improve the electronic health record system for all Australians.

Medical research

The Government will provide distributions of $10 million in 2015‑16 from the Medical Research Future Fund.

Aged care reform

From 1 February 2017, funding for home care will be allocated to the consumer based on their care needs. This will provide consumers with greater choice in deciding who provides their care.

Pensions

The Government will make the pension fairer by increasing the asset free thresholds and asset taper for pensions from 1 January 2017. This means pensioners with modest assets will receive more pension. Pensioners with more substantial assets will need to rely more on their own means.

The Government will not proceed with indexation of pensions by CPI only. Pensions will continue to increase twice a year with the higher of inflation or wages.

How your tax contributes

Our interactive chart allows you to approximate your income and see how your tax contributes to the Australian economy.

Select your income

The chart shows tax and government expenditure estimates for 2014-15. Tax paid is for a single taxpayer without children and includes personal income tax, medicare levy and the temporary budget repair levy, but not indirect taxes such as the goods and services tax. Government expenditure excludes goods and services tax transfers to states and territories.

Tax and benefits for Australians 2015

Explore the following examples to see how much assistance the Government provides different people and the tax they pay in 2015‑16.

Michelle

Michelle 

Single mum, one child

Michelle is a single mother with one child.

She works as a nurse four days a week and earns $60,000 a year.

Her son, Gus, is four and goes to long day care four days a week.

Michelle receives $8,032 more in government payments than she pays in income tax.

It takes 0.4 single taxpayers on average earnings to fund her net benefits.

Private Income $ 60,000
Family Tax Benefit Part A $ 3,334
Family Tax Benefit Part B $ 4,296
Child Care $ 12,549
Total Government Payments $ 20,179
Total Income $ 80,179
Income tax $ 12,147
Disposable Income $ 68,032

Marty

Marty 

Single father, two children.

Marty is a single father with two children, Jordan and Mackenzie.

He works two days a week as a personal trainer and earns $30,000 a year.

Jordan is four and Mackenzie is two. They both go to long day care on the two days Marty is at work.

Marty receives $36,304 more in government payments than he pays in income tax. It takes 1.9 single taxpayers on average earnings to fund his net benefits.

Private Income $ 30,000
Family Tax Benefit Part A $ 10,607
Family Tax Benefit Part B $ 4,296
Parenting Payment Single $ 9,835
Income Support Bonus $ 223
Child Care $ 13,877
Total Government Payments $ 38,838
Total Income $ 68,838
Income tax $ 2,534
Disposable Income $ 66,304

James

James 

Single father, two children.

James is a single father with two children, Lauren and Miles.

He works full time as a checkout assistant at the local supermarket and earns $40,000 a year.

Lauren is 11 and Miles is nine. They both go to their local primary school and after school care five days a week when James is at work.

James receives $17,224 more in government payments than he pays in income tax. It takes 0.9 single taxpayers on average earnings to fund his net benefits.

Private Income $ 40,000
Family Tax Benefit Part A $ 10,607
Family Tax Benefit Part B $ 3,092
Schoolkids Bonus $ 860
Child Care $ 6,812
Total Government Payments $ 21,371
Total Income $ 61,371
Income tax $ 4,147
Disposable Income $ 57,224

Lachlan and Veronica

Lachlan and Veronica  

Single income, one child

Lachlan and Veronica have one child, Katarina.

Veronica is personal assistant who works full time earning $60,000 a year.

Lachlan cares for their four year old daughter, Katarina.

Lachlan and Veronica pay $4,517 more in income tax than they receive in government payments.

Private Income $ 60,000
Family Tax Benefit Part A $ 3,334
Family Tax Benefit Part B $ 4,296
Total Government Payments $ 7,630
Total Income $ 67,630
Income tax $ 12,147
Disposable Income $ 55,483

Tom and Emily

Tom and Emily 

Single income, two children

Tom and Emily have two children, Jamie and Amy.

Tom is an IT consultant who earns $100,000 a year. Emily stays at home to care for their two kids. Jamie is 11 and Amy is nine. They both attend primary school.

Tom and Emily pay $20,166 more in income tax than they receive in government payments.

Private Income $ 100,000
Family Tax Benefit Part A $ 2,529
Family Tax Benefit Part B $ 3,092
Schoolkids Bonus $ 860
Single Income Family Supplement $ 300
Total Government Payments $ 6,781
Total Income $ 106,781
Income tax $ 26,947
Disposable Income $ 79,834

Curtis and Cecilia

Curtis and Cecilia  

Single income, three children

Curtis and Cecilia have three children, Kate, Joe and Jacqui.

Curtis is a plumber who works full time earning $80,000 a year.

Cecilia cares for their children three days a week and attends university two days a week, where she is studying part time.

Kate is 11 and Joe is nine. They both attend primary school and go to after school care on the two days Cecilia is at university. Jacqui is four and attends long day care on the two days Cecilia goes to university.

Curtis and Cecilia receive $5,497 more in government payments than they pay in income tax. It takes 0.3 single taxpayers on average earnings to fund his net benefits.

Private Income $ 80,000
Family Tax Benefit Part A $ 9,941
Family Tax Benefit Part B $ 4,296
Schoolkids Bonus $ 860
Single Income Family Supplement $ 300
Child care $ 9,247
Total Government Payments $ 24,644
Total Income $ 104,644
Income tax $ 19,147
Disposable Income $ 85,497

Richard and Nga

Richard and Nga  

Dual income, one child

Richard and Nga have one child, Y.

Richard is a fire fighter who works full time earning $56,000 a year. Nga is a part time teacher’s aide who works three days a week earning $24,000 a year. Their daughter, Y, is four and goes to long day care three days a week when her parents are at work.

Richard and Nga receive $30 more in government payments than they pay in income tax.

Private Income $ 80,000
Family Tax Benefit Part A $ 2,117
Family Tax Benefit Part B $ 562
Child care $ 9,025
Total Government Payments $ 11,704
Total Income $ 91,704
Income tax $ 11,674
Disposable Income $ 80,030

Anthony and Alexia

Anthony and Alexia  

Dual income, three children

Anthony and Alexia have three children, Ralph, Sandra and George.

Anthony is a full time photographer who earns $56,000 a year.

Alexia is a party planner who works 3 days a week and earns $24,000 a year.

Ralph is 11 and Sandra is nine. They both go to their local primary school and attend after school care three days a week when Anthony and Alexia are both at work. George is four and goes to long day care three days a week when Anthony and Alexia are both at work.

Anthony and Alexia receive $13,559 more in government payments than they pay in income tax. It takes 0.7 single taxpayers on average earnings to fund their net benefits.

Private Income $ 80,000
Family Tax Benefit Part A $ 9,941
Family Tax Benefit Part B $ 562
Schoolkids Bonus $ 860
Child care $ 13,870
Total Government Payments $ 25,233
Total Income $ 105,233
Income tax $ 11,674
Disposable Income $ 93,559

Mitch and Alison

Mitch and Alison  

Dual income, two children

Mitch and Alison have two children, Rebecca and Mandy.

Mitch works full time as a bus driver earning $56,000 a year.

Alison works three days a week as a hairdresser and earns $24,000 a year.

Rebecca is 11 and goes to primary school. She goes to after school care three days a week when Mitch and Alison are both at work. Mandy is four and goes to long day care three days a week when Mitch and Alison are both at work.

Mitch and Alison receive $5,327 more in government payments than they pay in income tax. It takes 0.3 single taxpayers on average earnings to fund their net benefits.

Private Income $ 80,000
Family Tax Benefit Part A $ 4,637
Family Tax Benefit Part B $ 562
Schoolkids Bonus $ 430
Child care $ 11,372
Total Government Payments $ 17,001
Total Income $ 97,001
Income tax $ 11,674
Disposable Income $ 85,327

Bailey and Natalie

Bailey and Natalie  

Dual income, one child

Bailey and Natalie have one son, Brayden.

They each work three days a week. Bailey works in a cafe and earns $50,000 a year.

Natalie is a housekeeper who earns $50,000 a year. Brayden is 4 and goes to long day care one day a week, when Bailey and Natalie are both at work.

Bailey and Natalie pay $13,893 more in income tax than they receive in government payments.

Private Income $ 100,000
Family Tax Benefit Part A $ 412
Child care $ 2,789
Total Government Payments $ 3,201
Total Income $ 103,201
Income tax $ 17,094
Disposable Income $ 86,107

Norman and Amale

Norman and Amale  

Dual income, two children

Norman and Amale have two children, Rami and Diana.

Norman is a full time bookkeeper who earns $50,000 a year. Amale is a full time switchboard operator who earns $50,000 a year. Rami is 11 and goes to primary school. He attends after school care five days a week. Diana is 4 and goes to long day care five days a week.

Norman and Amale receive $3,405 more in governments payments than they pay in income tax. It takes 0.2 single taxpayers on average earnings to fund their net benefits.

Private Income $ 100,000
Family Tax Benefit Part A $ 2,529
Schoolkids Bonus $ 430
Child care $ 17,540
Total Government Payments $ 20,499
Total Income $ 120,499
Income tax $ 17,094
Disposable Income $ 103,405

Peter and Ariel

Peter and Ariel  

Dual income, two children

Peter and Ariel have two children, Sidney and Andrew.

Peter is a farmhand who works four days a week earning $30,000 a year.

Ariel is a receptionist at the stockagent office who also works four days a week earning $30,000 a year. Sidney is 11 and Andrew is nine. They both attend primary school and after school care three days a week when their parents are at work.

Peter and Ariel receive $8,640 more in government payments than they pay in income tax. It takes 0.5 single taxpayers on average earnings to fund their net benefits.

Private Income $ 60,000
Family Tax Benefit Part A $ 8,637
Schoolkids Bonus $ 860
Child care $ 3,937
Total Government Payments $ 13,434
Total Income $ 73,434
Income tax $ 4,794
Disposable Income $ 68,640

Lincoln

Lincoln  

Single, no children

Lincoln is single and has no children.

He is a full time kitchen hand who earns $40,000 a year.

Lincoln pays $4,947 in income tax and receives no government payments.

Private Income $ 40,000
Total Income $ 40,000
Income tax $ 4,947
Disposable Income $ 35,053

Samuel

Samuel  

Single, no children

Samuel is single and has no children.

He is a full time accountant who earns $80,000 a year.

Samuel pays $19,147 in income tax and receives no government payments.

Private Income $ 80,000
Total Income $ 80,000
Income tax $ 19,147
Disposable Income $ 60,853

Jean

Jean 

Single, no children

Jean is single and has no children.

She is a full time lawyer who earns $100,000 a year.

Jean pays $26,947 in income tax and receives no government payments.

Private Income $ 100,000
Total Income $ 100,000
Income tax $ 26,947
Disposable Income $ 73,053

Sian

Sian 

Single retiree, homeowner

Sian is a single retiree with $50,000 in a deeming account.

She owns her own home.

Sian receives $22,617 in government payments and pays no income tax. It takes 1.2 single taxpayers on average earnings to fund her net benefits.

Private Income $ 896
Age Pension $ 22,617
Total Government Payments $ 22,617
Total Income $ 23,513
Income tax $ 0
Disposable income $ 23,513

 

 

Oscar

Oscar 

Single retiree, renter

Oscar is a single retiree with $100,000 in a deeming account.

He lives alone in a rental home.

Oscar receives $25,995 in governments payments and pays no income tax. It takes 1.4 single taxpayers on average earnings to fund his net benefits.

Private Income $ 2,521
Age Pension $ 22,617
Rent Assistance $ 3,378
Total Government Payments $ 25,995
Total Income $ 28,516
Income tax $ 0
Disposable Income $ 28,516

Josh and Ellen

Josh and Ellen 

Retired couple, homeowners

Josh and Ellen are a retired couple with $200,000 in a deeming account.

They own their own home.

Josh and Ellen receive $34,095 in government payments and pay no income tax. It takes 1.8 single taxpayers on average earnings to fund their net benefits.

Private Income $ 5,291
Age Pension $ 34,095
Total Government Payments $ 34,095
Total Income $ 39,386
Income tax $ 0
Disposable Income $ 39,386

Andy and Alicia

Andy and Alicia 

Retired couple, homeowners

Andy and Alicia are a retired couple with $400,000 in deeming assets between them.

They own their own home.

Andy and Alicia receive $29,864 in government payments and pay no income tax. It takes 1.6 single taxpayers on average earnings to fund their net benefits.

Private Income $ 11,791
Age Pension $ 29,864
Total Government Payments $ 29,864
Total Income $ 41,655
Income tax $ 0
Disposable Income $ 41,655

Notes

Private income comprises income from work and other sources (but not government assistance). Some recipients work part time. Children <6 are in long day care (at $8.55 per hour) and children 6-13 are in outside school hours care (at $7.65 per hour) as relevant. Income tax includes the Medicare Levy and the Temporary Budget Repair Levy. Where relevant, families are assumed to hold Private Health Insurance cover and so do not pay Medicare Levy Surcharge. Disposable income is the sum of private income and government payments less income tax.  The number of 'single taxpayers' refers to the number of single taxpayers with no dependents on average full time weekly ordinary time earnings required to fund the amount by which government assistance exceeds income tax. In 2015-16, this single taxpayer earns $79,454 and pays tax of $18,959. Income is assumed to be from investments which earn a rate of return equal to current deeming rates. The individual is assumed to be entitled to the maximum Rent Assistance.