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Australia's Overseas Aid Program 2000-01

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Statistical Annex

Table 2: Australia's ODA 1971-72 to 2000-01

Table 2: Australia's ODA 1971-72 to 2000-01

Diagram 17: DAC Member Countries' ODA/GNP ratios 199812

Diagram 17: DAC Member Countries' ODA/GNP ratios 1998

Diagram 18:DAC Member Countries' net ODA 199812

Diagram 18: DAC Member Countries' net ODA 1998

Diagram 19: Total Australian aid by region 2000-01 (% of total aid)

Diagram 19: Total Australian aid by region 2000-01 (% of total aid)

Diagram 20: Total aid by region by all donors 1998 (% of total aid)13

Diagram 20: Total aid by region by all donors 1998 (% of total aid)

Diagram 21: Trends in total Australian aid by region
(constant 1999-2000 prices)

Diagram 21:  Trends in total Australian aid by region (constant 1999-2000 prices)

Table 3: Total aid flows to aid recipients not detailed in Table 1

Table 3: Total aid flows to aid recipients not detailed in Table 1

Expenditure and Allocations

Table 4:Country Programs expenditure and allocations

Table 4: Country Programs expenditure and allocations

Table 5: Global Programs expenditure and allocations

Table 5: Global Programs expenditure and allocations

 

Table 6:Total ODA by subprograms

Table 6: Total ODA by subprograms

Table 7: Official aid through Australian and non-Australian NGOs

Table 7: Official aid through Australian and non-Australian NGOs

Table 8: Developing country students supported by the aid program14 

Table 8: Developing country students supported by the aid program

Sectoral Focus of the Aid Program

Table 9: Estimated total ODA by sector 2000-01 ($ million)

Table 9: Estimated total ODA by sector 2000-01 ($ million)

Diagram 22: Changes in sectoral expenditure 1977-78 and 1997-98:
Australia

Diagram 22: Changes in sectoral expenditure 1977-78 and 1997-98: Australia

 

Diagram 23: Changes in sectoral expenditure 1977-78 and 1997-98:
all donors
15

Diagram 23: Changes in sectoral expenditure 1977-78 and 1997-98: all donors

Technical Notes

Difference between accrual expenses and cash payments

Presentation

In this Statement all figures prior to 1999-2000 are in cash terms (the amount of cash paid out in a particular year). The government moved to an accrual budgeting framework in 1999-2000. Subsequently budget allocations (Tables 4 and 5) are presented in terms of accrual expenses (an expense recorded when the liability is incurred, rather than when cash is paid). The full value of multi-year liabilities, such as annual payments to the World Bank or the Asian Development Fund, is recorded as an expense at the time of commitment-not when the cash payments are made. This accounting treatment is used in AusAID's financial statements, available in the Foreign Affairs and Trade Portfolio Budget Statement and on the Internet at
http://www.dfat.gov.au/dept/budget
.

Total aid flow estimates for 1999-2000 onwards (Table 1) are adjusted from pure expenses by including the cash paid out to multi-year commitments, rather than the amount of new commitments. This is to give a more accurate picture of annual aid flows.

Estimates of sectoral expenditure are in cash terms throughout the Statement. Total ODA continues to be measured in terms of cash. A number of tables in this Budget statement include an `accrual adjustment' figure prior to calculating ODA. This figure includes adjustments for depreciation, investment, and expected net change in liabilities to creditors. Table 6 also makes explicit the adjustments required to multiyear liabilities, such as the multilateral development banks, to convert expenses to cash.

Conversion

Apart from those individual aid allocations affected by multiyear liabilities, the difference between cash and expenses is quite small. The differences can be summarised as follows:

Methodology of AusAID estimates

This Budget statement contains two sorts of figures for 1999-2000 and 2000-01 - allocations and estimates.

Tables 4 and 5 reflect the decisions taken by the Minister for Foreign Affairs at budget time to allocate expenses to various programs for 2000-01. These allocations are used by AusAID to manage the aid program and include items such as individual country programs, the emergency program, and the AusAID/NGO Cooperation Program (ANCP).

Other tables are based on estimates. These are published due to the interest associated in figures such as total aid going to any individual country (not just the country program), or the amount spent in any particular sector (such as education, governance or health). In estimating future expenditure or expenses, these figures are less reliable than allocations.

Estimated total aid flows

In estimating total aid flows, AusAID begins with budget allocations for particular countries (specific country program allocations). To these are added estimates of expenditure from `regional' and `global' programs that do not have country allocations specified at budget time. Such estimates reflect previous expenditure patterns, and are subject to change throughout the year. For example, funding from the humanitarian allocation is notionally distributed for 2000-01 to different countries in the same proportions as expected for 1999-2000 expenditure. Funding from the emergency allocation has been notionally distributed on the basis of an average of geographical distributions over the past four years (assistance to Indonesia and East Timor from the humanitarian and emergency allocations has been separately estimated, based on the latest assessment of probable needs). Other programs that are notionally allocated to countries in similar ways - a combination of past year distributions and latest estimates - include the ANCP, subsidies to volunteer organisations and regional programs such as the Asia Recovery and Reform Fund and the South East Asian Regional Program. Estimated total aid flows also include ODA expenditure by other Government departments. For example in 1999-2000 the Australian Government, through the Department of Immigration and Multicultural Affairs, provided $27.5 million for Kosovar evacuees in Australia, which is classified as ODA.

Estimated sectoral expenditure

While the sectors identified by the Government in Better Aid for a Better Future are high priorities for the Australian aid program, centralised allocations are generally not made for expenditure on a particular sector. Programming decisions are made on the basis of individual country strategies that are developed in consultation with partner governments, addressing their priority needs.

Expenditure in any particular sector is thus the result of numerous programming decisions, made in accordance with Government policy but not determined at budget time. Estimates published in this Budget statement are qualified and are subject to programming decisions throughout the year.

Sectoral expenditure estimates are reflective of past trends in expenditure recorded in AusAID's Activity Management System (AMS) for 1998-99 and 1999-2000. The AMS tracks planned and actual expenditure on individual projects. Each project is allocated sector codes, in accordance with DAC guidelines, which reflect the primary focus of the project, as well as attributing secondary codes to track indirect expenditure.
The 1999-2000 expenditure was extracted from the AMS in February, including planned expenditure to the end of the year, and was adjusted by formulae to account for over-programming. To this was added estimates for sectoral flows from multilateral organisations, based on these organisations' reports. Further information relating to the value of imputed flows from multilateral organisations can be obtained from the Statistical Services Section of AusAID (ph. +61 2 6206 4000).

Expenditure on the cross-cutting issues of environment and gender overlaps with expenditure on other sectors and should not be compared on the same basis.

Other estimates

Other figures estimated (rather than allocated) by methods similar to those outlined above include total flows through NGOs (which includes desk estimates of expenditure on NGOs funded through country programs) and progress against the food security pledge.

Notes to Tables

Table 2

1 Based on GDP(E) Implicit Price Deflators provided by the ABS.

2 This column compares ODA to GNI, not GNP, but the two measures are very similar. In late 1998, the Australian Bureau of Statistics changed its method of calculating GNI resulting in all historical measures of GNI, GNP and GDP being revised upwards and, consequently, ODA/GNP ratios revised downwards.

3 Australian Government contributions towards costs of educating private students from developing countries in Australian tertiary and secondary educational institutions were included in ODA for the first time in 1983-84.

4 In 1988-89 there was a one-off bringing forward of multilateral development bank payments, increasing 1988-89 but decreasing 1989-90 ODA expenditure.

5 This represents a real per cent increase over the 1999-2000 estimated Budget Figure of $1502.1 million as detailed in Table 1.

Table 3

1 Pacific Policy and Management Reform Program funding is included in the total aid flows to individual Pacific island countries.

2 These columns show expenses plus cash from capital injections and special appropriations, minus new commitments to multiyear liabilities such as the World Bank. It is not strictly comparable to cash figures, but the difference is less than 0.5 per cent.

3 See Technical Notes for an explanation of the relationship between expenses and cash.

Table 4

1 See Technical Notes for an explanation of the relationship between expenses and cash.

2 The PNG expense allocation for 2000-01 differs significantly from the 1999-2000 allocation because PNG budget support ($35.5 million in 1999-2000) was not recorded as an expense (the full value of the aid program's budget support for PNG was recorded as an expense at the time of its commitment). The final budget support payment from the aid program was made in 1999-2000. From 2000-01 all aid funding will be provided as jointly programmed (expense) activities.

3 The Nauru Settlement ($2.8 million) is not counted as an expense in 2000-01. The full value of the Nauru Settlement was recorded as an expense in 1993-94.

4 For the purposes of this table, Micronesia includes the Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, and the Republic of the Marshall Islands.

5 Funding for ADCOS scholarships is included in country program allocations rather than Cross Regional Programs.

Table 5

1 See Technical Notes for an explanation of the relationship between expenses and cash.

2 In 2000-01, the $500,000 allocation for the South Pacific Geoscience Commission - Disaster Management Unit is transferred to Pacific Regional from the Emergency Aid allocation.

3 Only new commitments to the Asian Development Fund, IFAD and HIPC are recorded as expenses. See Chapter 5 for details of 2000-01 cash contributions to these organisations.

4 Other international programs include the Global Environment Facility, MPMF, and international health programs. See Chapter 5 for details of
2000-01 cash contributions to these organisations.

5 Australian Youth Ambassadors for Development was originally funded in 1998-99 by the Government for a period of two years. Ongoing funding will be provided from within existing resources.

Table 6

1 See Technical Notes for an explanation of the relationship between expenses and cash.

2 Departmental ODA expenditure does not include receipts under Section 31 of the FMA Act, interest earned on bank deposits, and departmental carryover.

3 ACIAR's figure equals their total appropriation. ACIAR's full financial statements are available in the Foreign Affairs and Trade Portfolio Budget Statement at http://www.dfat.gov.au/dept/budget.

4 Other ODA includes ODA eligible activities by State Governments and Commonwealth Agencies other than AusAID and ACIAR. Included, for example, are capital contributions to multilateral development banks, funded by Treasury appropriations, or assistance to East Timor provided by the Australian Federal

Police Service. Minor adjustments are made for AusAID revenue items and fringe benefits tax, and other non-ODA eligible expenditure.

5 Refer to the explanation of multiyear liabilities in the Technical Notes. `Other accrual adjustments' factors out the net increase in aid program creditors and depreciation, and adds back in the cash used for purchasing assets.

Table 7

1 Expenditure for 1997-98 and 1998-99 corresponds to figures published in NGO annual reports.

2 Regional Programs are a sub-set of Country Programs first separated in 1998-99.

3 WID was a program with a specific funding allocation that is now being finalised.

Table 9

1 Figures are estimates only, current as at February 2000, and are qualified, subject to final programming decisions. Figures include adjustments for over programming and sectors not yet specified.

2 Series break between 1996-97 data and 1997-98 data due to activity recoding undertaken in 1998.

3 Does not include non-ODA eligible aid expenditure. Figures have been adjusted for over programming and sectors not yet specified.

4 Contribution to the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries Initiative.

5 Treasury contributions to Egypt debt relief.

Notes to Diagrams

Diagram 18

1 Australian 2000-01 estimate shown in 1998-99 constant prices (deflated).


12 The source for Diagrams 17 and 18 is DAC (1998) - figures are for the 1998 calendar year.


13 Source: DAC (1998)


14 Students in Australia, by country as at 15 March 2000


15 Source: DAC (1998)

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