Australian Government, 2009‑10 Budget
Budget

Appendix

AusAID Country and Global Programs

Table 13: AusAID country programs

Table 13: AusAID country programs

Notes: see page 79.

Table 14: AusAID global programs

Table 14: AusAID global programs

Notes: see page 79.

Total Australian Official Development Assistance

Table 15: Australia's ODA 1971-72 to 2009‑10

Table 15: Australia's ODA 1971-72 to 2009-10

Notes

Figures in tables and generally in the text have been rounded. Totals and percentages are calculated on un‑rounded totals. Any discrepancies between totals and sums of components in tables and generally in the text are due to rounding.

In this Statement, 'real' means adjusted for the effect of inflation. Real changes are calculated using the non‑farm Gross Domestic Product deflator.

All amounts are in Australian dollars (AUD) unless otherwise indicated. All estimates are exclusive of recoverable Goods and Services Tax (GST).

One billion is equal to one thousand million.

The source of data is AusAID unless otherwise stated.

Responding to the Global Recession (from page 11)

  1. World Bank (31 March 2009), World Bank Updates Global Economic Forecast http://econ.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/EXTDEC/0,,contentMDK:22122200~pagePK: 64165401~piPK:64165026~theSitePK:469372,00.html (at Data and Research section of World Bank website).
  2. Economic growth in East Asia and the Pacific is on aggregate expected to fall from 8.0 per cent in 2008 to 5.4 per cent in 2009. Many countries in these regions will record negative growth in 2009. In South Asia growth is expected to fall from 5.6 per cent in 2008 to 3.7 per cent in 2009, while in sub-Saharan Africa growth is forecast to fall from 4.9 per cent to 2.4 per cent over the same period.
  3. World Bank (April 2009), Global Monitoring Report 2009: A Development Emergency, Washington DC; Chen, S., Ravallion, M. (August 2008), Policy Research Working Paper 4703: The Developing World Is Poorer Than We Thought, But No Less Successful in the Fight against Poverty, World Bank Development Research Group, Washington DC, p 37
    http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTGLOMONREP2009/Resources/5924349-1239742507025/GMR09_book.pdf;
    http://www‑wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/IW3P/IB/2008/08/26/ 000158349_20080826113239/Rendered/PDF/WPS4703.pdf .
  4. International Labour Organization (ILO) (January 2009), Global Employment Trends, Geneva, p 20
    http://www.ilocarib.org.tt/portal/images/stories/contenido/pdf/LabourMarketInformation/get09.pdf.
  5. UNICEF (1 April 2009), Crisis Threatens to Create 'Lost Generation' http://www.unicef.org.au/mediaCentre-Detail.asp?ReleaseID=827.
  6. Espey, J., Harper, C., Jones, N., McKay, A. (March 2009), Overseas Development Institute (ODI) Background Note: Children in times of economic crisis: Past lessons, future policies
    http://www.odi.org.uk/resources/details.asp?id=2865&title=children-times-economic-crisis-past- lessons-future-policies.
  7. World Bank (February 2009), Global Economic Crisis: Assessing Vulnerability with a Poverty Lens
    http://siteresources.worldbank.org/NEWS/Resources/WBGVulnerableCountriesBrief.pdf.
  8. These impacts were displayed in the 1997 recession when the East Asian 'tiger' economies significantly reduced infrastructure investment. This contributed to sustained decline in economic growth over the following years; severe infrastructure backlogs emerged which slowed the recovery and reversed some of the gains made in poverty reduction.
Table 1. Composition of Australian ODA (page 16)
  1. column 'Budget Estimate 2008‑09' shows estimates provided in the 2008‑09 Budget at May 2008. The column 'Estimated Outcome 2008‑09' shows outcomes for 2008‑09 as estimated at May 2009.
  2. 'AusAID Country Programs' is detailed in Table 13 on page 71, and includes country and regional programs, as well as AIRPD grants and loans.
  3. 'AusAID Global Programs' is detailed in Table 14 on page 72, and is adjusted to include cash but exclude expenses associated with multi‑year liabilities (such as to the ADF and IDA). See notes (h) and (i) to Table 14 for details and explanation of these adjustments.
  4. 'AusAID Departmental' shows AusAID's Departmental expenses.
  5. Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR) financial statements are included in the Foreign Affairs and Trade Portfolio Budget Statement.
  6. 'Other Government Departments' includes ODA eligible expenditure by Australian Government and State Government agencies other than AusAID and ACIAR.
  7. 'Adjustments' includes adjustments to reconcile expenses to ODA, which is reported on a cash basis. These adjustments include accrual adjustments to adjust expenses to cash, and adjustments to exclude non ODA eligible departmental and administered expenditure. The adjustments exclude non ODA eligible departmental expenditure such as receipts under Section 31 of the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997, GST payments, and Fringe Benefits Tax. The adjustments also exclude non ODA eligible administered expenditure such as miscellaneous receipts and GST payments.
  8. ODA is reported on a cash basis.
  9. 'Real change from previous year outcome' shows the real increase in total ODA from the outcome figure for the previous year to the figure for the reference year.
Table 2: Australian ODA by partner countries and regions (page 17)

The column 'Budget Estimate 2008‑09' shows estimates provided in the 2008‑09 Budget at May 2008. The column 'Estimated Outcome 2008‑09' shows outcomes for 2008‑09 as estimated at May 2009.

  1. 'Solomon Islands' includes ODA eligible Australian Government expenditure under the Regional Assistance Mission to Solomon Islands.
  2. In this table, 'Nauru' includes cash paid in each year in line with the Nauru Settlement Treaty, in addition to amounts through the AusAID Country Program for Nauru (identified in Table 13 on page 71).
  3. For the purposes of this table, 'Micronesia' includes the Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, and the Republic of the Marshall Islands.
  4. 'Regional and Other Pacific' includes amounts attributable to the Pacific region (but not to a specific country) from the Pacific Regional program (see Table 13 for amounts and Table 3 for program details) as well as AusAID global programs and other government departments.
  5. 'Indonesia' estimated expenditure in 2009‑10 includes $111.9 million for AIPRD. Expected outcome for 2008‑09 includes $250.9 million for AIPRD.
  6. 'East Asia Regional' shows amounts attributable to the East Asia region (but not to a specific country) from the East Asia Regional program (see Table 13 for amounts and Table 4 for program details), AusAID global programs (see Table 14 for a breakdown), and other government departments.
  7. 'South Asia Regional' shows amounts attributable to the South Asia region (but not a specific country) from the South Asia Regional program (see Table 13 for amounts and Table 6 for program details), AusAID global program (see Table 14 for a breakdown), and other government departments.
  8. 'Core contributions to multilateral organisations and other ODA not attributed to particular countries or regions' includes payments to some UN and Commonwealth organisations, and ODA eligible departmental expenditure. The ODA eligible components of cash payments to IDA, ADF, GEF, HIPC and the MPMF are also included in this line item (see page 65 for 2009‑10 funding levels).
  9. 'Adjustments' — see notes to Table 1 (f) above.
  10. ODA is reported on a cash basis.

Diagrams 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7

AusAID budget allocations are made to country, regional and global programs, rather than to specific sectors. The projections of expenditure in each sector for 2009‑10 shown in Diagram 3 are generated using an analysis of the nature of actual and planned expenditure in the current (2008‑09) year combined with the expected sectoral allocation of new resources through this 2009‑10 Budget. Further, while AusAID tracks ODA expenditure according to sector and sub-sector classifications endorsed by the OECD DAC, information on projected sectoral allocations in this document is presented in line with the strategic direction and priorities of the development assistance program and in some cases will not directly align with DAC Sector definitions.

Priorities for Australia's development assistance (from page 19)

Rural Development
  1. Ban-Ki Moon United Nations Secretary General Concluding Remarks to High-Level Meeting on Food Security for All, 27 January 2009, Madrid
    http://www.ransa2009.org/html/docs/docs/speech_Ban_KiMoon_ransa2009.pdf.
Microfinance and financial services
  1. Key bilateral and multilateral partners include the International Financial Corporation, the Asian Development Bank, the Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee and the United Nations Development Programme.
Infrastructure
  1. Asian Development Bank (January 2008), Technical Assistance Report: Energy for All Initiative, p 1
    http://www.adb.org/Documents/TARs/REG/40629-REG-TAR.pdf.
  2. World Economic Forum (October 2008), The Global Competitiveness Report 2008-2009, Geneva, p 384
    http://www.weforum.org/pdf/GCR08/GCR08.pdf.
Education
  1. United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) (2007), Education For All Global Monitoring Report 2008; Education for All by 2015: Will we make it?, UNESCO Publishing and Oxford University Press, p 42
    http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0015/001547/154743e.pdf.
  2. UNESCO (2008), Education For All Global Monitoring Report 2009: Overcoming Inequality: Why Governance matters, UNESCO Publishing and Oxford University Press, pp 60-1
    http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0017/001776/177683e.pdf.
  3. UNESCO (2008), Education For All Global Monitoring Report 2009: Overcoming Inequality: Why Governance matters, UNESCO and Oxford University Press, p 204.
  4. The six goals of Education for All are:
    1. Expanding and improving comprehensive early childhood care and education, especially for the most vulnerable and disadvantaged children.
    2. Ensuring that by 2015 all children, particularly girls, children in difficult circumstances and those belonging to ethnic minorities, have access to, and complete, free and compulsory primary education of good quality.
    3. Ensuring that the learning needs of all young people and adults are met through equitable access to appropriate learning and life-skills programs.
    4. Achieving a 50 per cent improvement in levels of adult literacy by 2015, especially for women, and equitable access to basic and continuing education for all adults.
    5. Eliminating gender disparities in primary and secondary education by 2005, and achieving gender equality in all levels of education by 2015, with a focus on ensuring girls' full and equal access to and achievement in basic education of good quality.
    6. Improving all aspects of the quality of education and ensuring excellence of all so that recognised and measurable learning outcomes are achieved by all, especially in literacy, numeracy and essential life-skills.

Source: UNESCO, The Dakar Framework for Action, Education for All: Meeting our Collective Commitments, Text adopted by the World Education Forum, Dakar, Senegal, 26-28 April 2000.

  1. Progress in Reading Literacy Study 2006 cited in UNESCO (2008), Education For All Global Monitoring Report 2009: Overcoming Inequality: Why Governance matters, UNESCO Publishing and Oxford University Press, p 111.
Health
  1. UNICEF (2008), The State of Asia-Pacific's Children 2008, pp 4, 7; UNAIDS (August 2008), 2008 Report on the Global AIDS Epidemic, pp 211-3, 219 (Annex 1: HIV and AIDS estimates and data, 2007 and 2001)
    http://www.unicef.org/publications/files/SOAPC_2008_080408.pdf;
    http://www.unaids.org/en/KnowledgeCentre/HIVData/GlobalReport/2008/2008_Global_report.asp.
  2. World Health Organisation (WHO) Regional Offices for South-East Asia and the Western Pacific (2008), Health in Asia and the Pacific, Geneva, Chapter 8, p 111
    http://www.wpro.who.int/publications/Health+in+Asia+and+the+Pacific.htm.
  3. WHO (2008), World Malaria Report 2008, Geneva, pp142-4
    http://malaria.who.int/wmr2008/malaria2008.pdf.
  4. UNAIDS and WHO (December 2007), AIDS Epidemic Update, Geneva, pp 1, 7, 21
    http://data.unaids.org/pub/EPISlides/2007/2007_epiupdate_en.pdf.
  5. Human Rights Watch (14 January 2009), World Report 2009 - Papua New Guinea; Papua New Guinea National AIDS Council Secretariat and Partners (January 2008), Papua New Guinea United Nations General Assembly Special Session on HIV and AIDS (UNGASS) 2008 Country Progress Report (Reporting Period January 2006- December 2007), p 20
    http://www.unhcr.org/refworld/docid/49705f95c.html (23/04/09);
    http://data.unaids.org/pub/Report/2008/papua_new_guinea_2008_country_progress_report_en.pdf.
  6. AusAID (2009), Intensifying the Response: Halting the spread of HIV; Australia's International Development strategy for HIV, Canberra, p 11
    http://www.ausaid.gov.au/publications/pdf/AusAIDHIVStrategy2009.pdf.
  7. UNAIDS (August 2008), 2008 Report on the Global AIDS Epidemic, Geneva, cited in AusAID (2009), Intensifying the Response: Halting the spread of HIV; Australia's International Development strategy for HIV, Canberra, p 8.
  8. 25. WHO (March 2009), Global Tuberculosis Control 2009: Epidemiology, Strategy and Financing, Geneva, pp 7, 113
    http://www.who.int/entity/tb/publications/global_report/2009/pdf/full_report.pdf
Gender Equality
  1. United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM) (2008), Bridging the Gap - Financing for Gender Equality, United Nations Non-Governmental Liaison Service and UNIFEM, New York, p 4; Levine et al (2008), Girls Count: A Global Investment and Action Agenda, Center for Global Development, Washington DC, pp16-7; World Bank (2001), Engendering Development: Through Gender Equality in Rights, Resources and Voice, Washington DC, pp18-9
    http://www.un-ngls.org/IMG/pdf/UNIFEM.pdf;
    http://www.cgdev.org/files/15154_file_GirlsCount.pdf;
    http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2001/03/01/ 000094946_01020805393496/Rendered/PDF/multi_page.pdf.
  2. United Nations (2008), The Millennium Development Goals Report 2008, New York, p 17; UNESCO (2008), Education for All Global Monitoring Report 2009: Regional Fact Sheet: South and West Asia, Paris, p 1
    http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/pdf/The%20Millennium%20Development%20Goals%20Report%202008.pdf;
    http://www.unesco.org/education/gmr2009/press/Factsheet_SWAsia.pdf.
  3. 28. While this figure continues to be widely cited, anecdotal evidence suggests the Maternal Mortality Rate in East Timor is much higher; WHO (2004), Maternal Mortality in 2000: Estimates developed by WHO, UNICEF and UNFPA, Geneva p 21
    http://www.who.int/reproductive-health/publications/maternal_mortality_2000/mme.pdf.
  4. 29. United Nations (2008), The Millennium Development Goals Report 2008, New York, p 19.
  5. 30. United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UNESCAP) (2007), Economic and Social Survey of Asia and the Pacific 2007, pp viii, 103-6
    http://www.unescap.org/pdd/publications/survey2007/01_Survey_2007.pdf.
  6. 31. AusAID Office of Development Effectiveness (2008) Violence against Women in Melanesia and East Timor: Building on Global and Regional Promising Approaches, Canberra, pp vii, 4-5
    http://www.ode.ausaid.gov.au/publications/pdf/vaw_cs_full_report.pdf.
  7. 32. World Bank (2009), Women in 33 Countries Highly Vulnerable to Financial Crisis Effects. Press Release No:2009/245/PREM. Washington D.C; Buvinic, M (World Bank, February 2009), The Global Financial Crisis: Assessing Vulnerability for Women and Children, Identifying Policy Responses, p 1
    http://pslforum.worldbankgroup.org/docs/WBFinancialCrisis.doc.
  8. 33. AusAID Office of Development Effectiveness (2008) Violence against Women in Melanesia and East Timor: Building on Global and Regional Promising Approaches, Canberra
    http://www.ode.ausaid.gov.au/publications/pdf/vaw_cs_full_report.pdf.
Helping People with a Disability
  1. United Nations (2008), Mainstreaming disability in the development agenda (E/CN.5/2008/6), para 2
    http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=708.
  2. World Bank (2003), Education for All: Including Children with Disabilities, p 1
    http://siteresources.worldbank.org/DISABILITY/Resources/280658-1172610312075/EFAIncluding.pdf.
  3. Asian Development Bank (2005) Disability Brief: Identifying and Addressing the Needs of Disabled People, p 5
    http://www.adb.org/Documents/Reports/Disabled-People-Development/disability-brief.pdf.
  4. Frick, K. D., and Foster, A (2003), The magnitude and cost of global blindness: An increasing problem that can be alleviated, American Journal of Ophthalmology, 135(4):47, pp 1—47.
  5. World Bank (2009), Roads and Highways: Road Safety, para 2 (Economic Perspective on Traffic Safety)
    http://www.worldbank.org/transport/roads/safety.htm (29/4/09).
Strengthening Effectiveness of Development Assistance
  1. The other bilateral donor is the Netherlands.
Multilateral Engagement
  1. The 41 borrowing country members of the Asian Development Bank are: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Burma, Cambodia, China, Cook Islands, East Timor, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Georgia, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Kyrgyz Republic, Laos, Maldives, Malaysia, Marshall Islands, Mongolia, Nauru, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Palau, Tajikistan, Thailand, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Vietnam.
Table 13: AusAID country programs (page 71)

This table includes AusAID country and regional program expenses for all partner countries and regions, and also includes AIPRD grants and loans. The column 'Estimated Outcome 2008‑09' shows estimates for 2008‑09 as at May 2009.

  1. 'Solomon Islands' includes an ODA eligible AusAID estimate of $63.6 million for the Regional Assistance Mission to Solomon Islands.
  2. 'Nauru' country program estimate shown here does not include cash paid in line with the Nauru Settlement Treaty (as the expense was recorded in 1993‑94).
  3. For the purposes of this table, 'Micronesia' includes the Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, and the Republic of the Marshall Islands.
  4. 'Indonesia' includes AIPRD grants and loans.
  5. 'AusAID Country Programs' includes country and regional programs, as well as AIRPD grants and loans. It is also shown as a line item in Table 1 on page 16.
Table 14: AusAID global programs (page 72)

The column labelled 'Estimated Outcome 2008‑09' shows estimates for 2008‑09 as at May 2009.

  1. From 2008‑09, funding for the International Refugee Fund has been redistributed within 'Humanitarian, Emergency, and Refugee Programs'. Redistributed funding will continue to support responses to refugee and displacement issues, predominately through United Nations and other international organisations.
  2. Multilateral Replenishments' includes expenses for new commitments to multilateral development banks and other multilateral funds. There are no new commitments budgeted for in 2009‑10 as at May 2009. See Table 10 on page 65 for multilateral program details, including a breakdown of the $259.8 million estimated cash by multilateral institution in 2009‑10 (items for IDA, ADF, HIPC, GEF and MPMF in Table 10).
  3. 'Global Health Programs' includes the GAVI Alliance, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and other international health programs.
  4. 'Global Environment Programs' includes the Global Crop Diversity Trust, the International Tropical Timber Organisation, the International Forest Carbon Initiative and other climate change initiatives.
  5. 'Global Education Programs' includes the Education for All Fast Track Initiative and UNICEF's Back on Track Initiative.
  6. 'Commonwealth organisations and Other' includes the Commonwealth Fund for Technical Cooperation, Commonwealth Foundation, Commonwealth Youth Program, the Consultative Group to Assist the Poor and some other minor Commonwealth organisations.
  7. 'AusAID Global Programs' includes expense items only. This is converted to an expenditure figure by adjustments detailed at (h) and (i) below.
  8. 'Less: new multi-year commitments' removes the total expense commitment for new multi‑year liabilities. There are no new commitments budgeted for in 2009‑10 as at May 2009.
  9. 'Add: cash paid to multi-year liabilities' adds back $263.5 million in cash expected to be paid to multilateral commitments in 2009‑10, of which $259.8 million relates to cash funding for multilateral organisations — see Table 10 on page 65 for program details and amounts in 2009‑10 for each multilateral organisation. The $263.5 million in cash for this item ('Add: cash paid to multi-year liabilities') also includes other cash paid against multi‑year liabilities such as the Nauru Settlement Treaty (also discussed in note (b) to Table 2 on page 75).
  10. 'AusAID Global Programs' includes AusAID global program expenses, adjusted for multi‑year liabilities. It is also shown as a line item in Table 1 on page 16.

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